Penelope's father, Ebenezer Terry, was Enfield's earliest physician.  Penelope was her father's pupil and assistant, and Enfield's first female doctor.

When the Lexington Alarm was raised in April 1775, Penelope's husband, Thomas Abbey, left with the other men from Enfield to engage the British. Thus began his long and distinguished service to the American Cause. Penelope remained at home to provide medical care to the community. Penelope practiced obstetrics for 33 years and assisted in 1,389 births. She welcomed into the world an entire generation of the town's inhabitants and is well worthy of commemoration.

Our chapter has nine past or current members who are descended from Captain Thomas Abbey and his wife Penelope Terry Abbey, and three past members who are descendants of Penelope's parents, Ebenezer Terry and Mary Helms Terry.

Penelope Terry Abbey is buried in the Enfield Street Cemetery on Route 5 in Enfield, Connecticut. The marble seat sits under a tree that marks Penelope's grave. It is of the same Greek style as the seats around Captain Thomas Abbey's memorial, located in front of the Congregational Church on Enfield Street. Both monuments were installed in November 1916, by Alden Freeman,
great-great-grandson of this couple.

Penelope was a direct descendant of Samuel Terry, 1632-1731,  and his wife Ann Lobdell, who were among the first settlers of Springfield, Massachusetts.

Penelope married Captain Thomas Abbey on June 22, 1749, in Enfield, Connecticut. Thomas was the son of Thomas Abbey, Jr. and Mary Pease Abbey. Thomas was born in Enfield, Connecticut, on April 11, 1731. He died there June 1, 1811, at age 80.

Penelope Terry was born in Enfield on February 5, 1729/30, and died in Enfield, Connecticut, on December 2, 1817, at age 87. She was the daughter of Dr. Ebenezer Terry, 1696-1780,  and Mary Helms Terry, 1702-1764.

Our Chapter Namesake

LOCATION

888 Griffiths Way,
Mainland ML12345

LOCATION

888 Griffiths Way,
Mainland ML12345